Lincoln

Lincoln

Packed with historic sites, pretty streets and excellent schools, this cathedral town is hugely underrated. So what’s it really like to live in Lincoln?

“Home to just under 100,000 people, this small city has been occupied since the Iron Age and is now on of the fastest growing urban centres in the UK”

Moving to Lincoln

Compared to other famous cathedral cities such as Canterbury, Lincoln receives very little fanfare, with much of the country remaining unaware of its many historic charms. Home to just under 100,000 people, this small city has been occupied since the Iron Age and is now on of the fastest growing urban centres in the UK, with residents drawn to its rich heritage, pretty pedestrianised streets, and excellent schools.

Included in the Sunday Times’ list of the UK’s ‘Best Places to Live’ in 2014, the county town of Lincolnshire is surrounded by beautiful countryside, while within the city the famous Lincoln Cathedral and Norman Lincoln Castle bring in plenty of visitors – although despite its many charms, the city never gets as crowded as its cathedral city counterparts, leaving the locals free to enjoy these sites year-round.

House prices in Lincoln

With an average house price of £170,000, property in Lincoln is more affordable than in many parts of the UK, and significantly more affordable than most cathedral cities. Traditionally the uphill area has been seen as more prestigous than downhill, with the former offering historic properties and the latter now offering new developments and modern apartments. Minster and North Hykeham are two popular areas of the city, while the nearby village of Nettleham is a hit with families looking for a blend of city and country.

“With an average house price of £170,000, property in Lincoln is more affordable than in many parts of the UK, and significantly more affordable than most cathedral cities.”

Travel

With no motorway in the county, Lincoln offers relatively poor road connections with the nearest motorway connection being the M1 close to Sheffield, which is linked to Lincoln via the A57. Train links are better, with direct services from Lincoln Central to locations including Nottingham and London, the latter taking around two hours. Within the city a network of buses transport residents and visitors around, while for those looking to travel further afield Humberside Airport is the closest commercial airport, with flights to destinations across the UK and Europe.

Lifestyle

For a small city, shopping and dining in Lincoln certainly makes an impact – there’s a great range of both big brands and independent places to be found here. Broadly speaking, the uphill part of Lincoln is where most of the independent boutiques, particularly in the Cathedral Quarter where you’ll find The Terrace, home to workshops and studios, as well as antique shops, local markets and renowned delicatessens for stocking up on the famed Lincolnshire sausages. Downhill is the more modern and commercial part of the city, with the large Waterside Shopping Centre offering an array of high street brands including Topshop, Next and New Look, as well as various chain restaurants.

The dining scene is equally lively, with Steep Hill and the Brayford Waterfront both packed with popular restaurants. The Cheese Society Cafe, The Bronze Pig and the Jews House Restaurant are all renowned spots in the city, as well as the famous Browns Pie Shop.

Groceries

Locals in Lincoln are spoilt for choice when it comes to supermarkets with large branches of Tesco, Asda, Sainsburys, Morrisons and Waitrose as well as smaller stores. The area surrounding the city is known for its farming and excellent produce, so expect to find plenty of independent grocers and farmers markets too.

Health & Sport

When a stroll around the pretty city centre won’t quite cut it, Lincoln has plenty of fitness facilities to keep you in shape, ranging from branches of national chains such as Fitness First and David Lloyd to seven well-appointed council-run leisure centres.

Culture

As a historic city, it’s no surprise that Lincoln is packed with cultural spots and historic sites. Lincoln Castle, the Medieval Bishop’s Palace, Lincoln Cathedral and the nearby Burghley House are all ideal spots for fans of local history, as is the fascinating Museum of Lincolnshire Life. For something a little more modern, the Aviation Heritage Centre is not far from Lincoln and the nearby Scampton Airfield is home to the Red Arrows. The city also hosts plenty of annual markets and festivals, including a charming German Christmas Market every winter.

“For a small city, shopping and dining in Lincoln certainly makes an impact – there’s a great range of both big brands and independent places to be found here.”

Schools and Education

Lincolnshire offers a wide selection of schools and educational establishments, and sees on average better results than the national average – making the city a top choice for may parents. Leading primary schools in Lincolnshire include The Fishtoft School, Normanby Primary School and Ingham Primary School, all of which have 100% of pupils reaching expected levels of Maths and English, with a further 24 schools in the area boasting the same results. Among Secondary Schools, Caistor Grammar School and Boston High School are among the best selective schools, and William Farr CofE Comprehensive School a top choice in the state sector.

For further education, Lincoln has both Lincoln College and the University of Lincoln, the latter of which has risen rapidly through the league tables and is now ranked among the UK’s top 40 universities.

Safety

With an average of 90 crimes per 1000, London is a relatively safe city with no major crime issues or concerns.

Green Space

For those looking to escape the city, Lincoln is surrounded by a number of beautiful open spaces, including the Whisby Nature Reserve and The Wash, a Site of Specific Scientific Interest (SSSI). Covering more than 200 acres, Hartsholme Country Park is one of the most popular parks in the city of Lincoln, with highlights including a camping area, lakes, and woodland. Meanwhile if you’d looking to stretch your legs on a long walk, the Fossdyke Canal Trail offers six miles of lovely scenery along the Fossdyke Navigation.

?
explore your postcode

Best area to live in Lincolnshire?

Score and discover a local areas
0
transport
0
education
0
grocery
0
green
0
safety
0
quiet
0
lifestyle
Spin circleSpin point
!This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Review our privacy policy for more details.