Liverpool

Liverpool

Friendly, affordable and packed with culture, this young city in the north west is a hidden gem for first-time buyers. So what’s it really like to live in Liverpool?

 

“The population is young and diverse, with over 42% of residents under the age of 20 and large Chinese and West Indian communities”

Moving to Liverpool

Despite being the homeland of the Beatles, the Scouse accent and two Premier League football clubs, the city of Liverpool has often found itself overshadowed in the North West by the nearby city of Manchester. But take a closer look, and you’ll find that this friendly, exciting city is not only a major cultural hub, but rapidly being recognised as one of the most underrated urban centres in the UK.

Currently home to just under 500,000 residents, Liverpool was a major port and industrial centre for many years, and while much of the trading that made it rich has ceased, the old wharves and docks have undergone a huge transformation in recent years, with regeneration projects overhauling tired areas and building cultural institutions, chic bars and top-notch restaurants for the residents to enjoy. The population is young and diverse, with over 42% of residents under the age of 20 and large Chinese and West Indian communities, whilst the music scene that thrived here in the 1950s and 1960s can still be felt today, alongside a renowned nightlife scene and the highest number of museums and galleries outside of London.

House prices in Liverpool

With an average property price of around £150,000 as of 2017, house prices in Liverpool are significantly lower than the UK average, and the city is more affordable than similar urban centres such as Manchester and Birmingham. For those seeking a historic property, there are actually more Georgian houses here than in the picturesque city of Bath, while sleek city apartments are springing up rapidly around the many dockside developments. Popular suburbs for families in Liverpool include West Derby, Knott Ash, Childwall and Allerton, while the nearby village of Woollen is a prime choice for those who prefer to be slightly further out of the city.

“For those seeking a historic property, there are actually more Georgian houses here than in the picturesque city of Bath, while sleek city apartments are springing up rapidly around the many dockside developments”

Travel

With a busy train station and numerous motorways nearby, Liverpool is well-connected for travelling around the UK. The M62, M57 and M53 surround the city, whilst Lime Street Station offers direct trains to London in just over two hours, as well as regular direct services to Manchester and Birmingham. Numerous bus routes and regional trains transport locals around the city, while the CityBike hire scheme is increasingly popular with those looking to avoid the city centre traffic.

For international travel, Liverpool John Lennon Airport is connected to destinations across Europe, and the historic Liverpool Port offers ferries to Ireland and the Isle of Man.

Lifestyle

Lively Liverpool is has developed a stellar dining and nightlife reputation over the years, with enough fine dining restaurants, cocktail bars and world-class clubs such as Alma de Cuba and Nation to keep even the most A-list footballers happy. The Docks have become a hotspot for high-end cuisine, with Panoramic 34 and Etsu among the city’s best restaurants as well as The Art School Restaurant. On the other end of the spectrum, there’s plenty of quirky coffee shops and cool, budget-friendly cafes to be found in the city centre, Ropewalks and around the university, with top spots including The Egg Vegetarian Cafe and Filter and Fox.

Shopping opportunities are just as diverse, thanks to the vast Liverpool ONE development, an open-air shopping complex with 160 stores ranging from designer brands at Harvey Nichols to fashion bargains at H&M. The city centre also boasts an impressive selection of eclectic independent shops, including the legendary Probe Records, secondhand bookshops Reid of Liverpool and the creative hub of The Bluecoat.

Groceries

Keen home cooks won’t be short of grocery stores in Liverpool, with branches of major supermarket chains such as Asda, Tesco and Morrisons spread across the city, as well as a number of international supermarkets including Sida Chinese Supermarket and Tak Supermarket.

Health & Sport

Liverpool is famous on a national sporting level due to the Grand National at Aintree and two Premier League football teams in the form of Everton and Liverpool FC, but even on a more local level its clear that sport plays a big role in Liverpool life, with plenty of gyms and fitness facilities spread across the city. These range from branches of major chains such as PureGym and The Gym, to council-run services and small, boutique studios.

Culture

Voted European Capital of Culture in 2008, cultural life in Liverpool shows no since of slowing down nearly a decade later – the city is packed with cultural offerings, with highlights including the Tate Liverpool, the Echo Arena (where the likes of Elton John, Beyonce and Oasis have performed), the Walker Art Gallery and the Merseyside Maritime Museum. Fans of the city’s most famous exports will enjoy the Beatles Story, while Speke Hall is a must-visit for any local history buffs. Add thousands of listed buildings, an annual Shakespeare Festival and a number of cinemas, and you’ll find you’re never short of activities in Liverpool.

“Lively Liverpool is has developed a stellar dining and nightlife reputation over the years, with enough fine dining restaurants, cocktail bars and world-class clubs such as Alma de Cuba and Nation to keep even the most A-list footballers happy”

Schools and Education

Family-friendly Liverpool offers a wide selection of schools, many of which boast impressive exam results. St Vincent de Paul Catholic Primary School, Corinthian Community Primary School and Whitfield Primary School are among the best primary schools in the area,  all scoring above 96% at expected levels of Maths and English, while for older pupils leading secondary schools include King David High School, the selective Bluecoat School, and the independent Liverpool College.

Liverpool is also home to three universities, with the University of Liverpool leading the way as the most prestigious and regularly ranking among the top 30 universities in the UK.

Safety

Liverpool has an average crime rate of 100 crimes per 1000 people as of 2016, which is higher than UK average. However, it is generally considered to be a safe city, and many of the crimes committed are as a result of anti-social behaviour on weekends in the busy city centre.

Green Space

Despite its industrial reputation, Liverpool is actually among the top 10 greenest cities in the UK, with over 16% of the city occupied by green spaces including the beautiful Victorian Parks. Among the many parks on offer, resident favourites include the 82 hectare Sefton Park, home to a number of cafes, a grotto and a famous Peter Pan statue, the vast Croxteth Country Park surrounding Croxteth Hall, and Newsham Park, which boasts a bandstand and two lakes.

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